Friday, 21 September 2012

Keep it Simple

 You know, I used to be a pretty regular blogger, never stuck for knitting related stuff to blether on about. I thought it would be easy to get back into the swing of posting as my enthusiasm for all things knitting related is greater than ever but I was still a bit stuck.

Then I realised that I was probably over thinking things and really, all I needed to do was what I have always done - talk about what I'm making, and given the amount of stuff I have 'on the needles' at the moment should give me enough material to keep me going daily from now until the end of the year...

For  a change, however I thought I would talk about what I have on the spindle. I am lucky enough to have a lovely spinning wheel, which I do enjoy using but I have found recently I am using a drop spindle more and more. I spend quite a lot of my days on the move and not having a car I find that a nice lump of roving, and a drop spindle in a bag can really deliver beyond its weight in entertainment when trying to travel light. Here is my current project.

The roving is a Shetland/ silk blend divided into four pieces, each on dyed in the same graduated colour sequence from Katie at Hill Top Cloud. I bought it at Woolfest this year. Katie laughed when I chose it saying that knowing my colour preferences she could have picked this one for me!


Here are some of the singles spun on an IST spindle by Ian Tait with an elm burr whorl from this year's Fibre East Festival. One of the nice things about festivals is to be able to buy directly from crafspeople who are equally passionate about their craft. The elm in this spindle is gorgeous with faults through which the light shines which add to its character. Ian said that he had the elm for ages feeling that it was almost too good to cut into then realised that it's there to be used. A lesson for all of us with skeins in our stash that are almost too precious to knit - go on - get them out, choose a pattern and go for it!

 One of the pleasures of spindle spinning is that you don't have to fill a couple of bobbins before you can add variety to your day with a bit of plying. There are lots of different ways of doing this - I tend to wind mine off into a centre pull ball and ply from both ends of the ball. This yarn is made from two of the 25g pieces spun from dark to light then light to dark so that the colour change would stay loosely intact when plied from the middle.


So far so good - let's see how the second half turns out.


4 comments:

Sally said...

GORGEOUS!!!!! the colors, the spindle, your resulting yarn. Wow.

Rosie said...

And now a picture of it knitted up into something lovely...........

Katie said...

I keep telling people who are scared of spinning something is that the sheep will grow more wool!
Lovely spinning as ever Jane.

Tani@Tagana Rose said...

So pretty...love the colours!!